Showing posts with label social media. Show all posts
Showing posts with label social media. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 19, 2023

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Sunday, November 26, 2023

From Likes to Low Self-Esteem: Examining Social Media's Role in Shaping Women's Beauty Ideals

 Likes to Low Self-Esteem: Examining Social Media's Role in Shaping Women's Beauty Ideals by Sarnia de la Maré FRSA

In recent years, the rise of social media platforms has revolutionized the way people interact and communicate. Women, in particular, have become increasingly engaged in online spaces, using social media as a means to express themselves, connect with others, and share their lives. However, this digital revolution has also brought about a new set of challenges, especially when it comes to women's beauty ideals.

The influence of social media on female beauty standards and ideals has become a topic of great concern among women's study researchers and scholars. The constant exposure to carefully curated images of idealized beauty on platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Snapchat has led to unrealistic expectations and a negative impact on women's self-esteem.

This subchapter aims to provide an in-depth exploration of the background surrounding the study of social media's role in shaping women's beauty ideals. By understanding the historical context, theoretical perspectives, and empirical research on this topic, we can gain valuable insights into the impact of social media on women's self-perception and body image.

To begin with, it is essential to acknowledge that societal beauty ideals have long been a subject of scrutiny and critique in women's studies. Throughout history, women have faced immense pressure to conform to narrow standards of beauty, perpetuated by various mediums, including advertising, magazines, and now, social media. These beauty ideals often emphasize unrealistic body proportions, flawless skin, and a particular aesthetic that is unattainable for most women.

The advent of social media has exacerbated these unrealistic beauty standards, as it allows for constant comparison and self-objectification. Women are bombarded with images of airbrushed models, influencers, and celebrities who seem to effortlessly embody the ideal beauty standards. This constant exposure creates a toxic cycle, leading women to compare themselves unfavorably, ultimately resulting in low self-esteem and negative body image.

Furthermore, this subchapter will delve into the theoretical frameworks used in understanding the influence of social media on women's beauty ideals. It will explore concepts such as self-objectification theory, social comparison theory, and media effects theory, shedding light on how these theories contribute to our understanding of the detrimental impact of social media on women's self-perception.

Finally, this subchapter will provide an overview of empirical studies conducted in this field, showcasing the findings that further support the negative influence of social media on women's beauty ideals. These studies highlight the correlation between excessive social media use, body dissatisfaction, and low self-esteem among women.

By examining the background of this study, women's study researchers can gain a comprehensive understanding of the influence of social media on female beauty standards and ideals. This knowledge is crucial in developing strategies and recommendations to counteract the negative impact of social media and promote healthier beauty ideals that celebrate diversity, inclusivity, and self-acceptance.

©2023 Sarnia de la Mare (FRSA)

From Likes to Low Self-Esteem: Examining Social Media's Role in Shaping Women's Beauty Ideals

 Likes to Low Self-Esteem: Examining Social Media's Role in Shaping Women's Beauty Ideals by Sarnia de la Maré FRSA

In recent years, the rise of social media platforms has revolutionized the way people interact and communicate. Women, in particular, have become increasingly engaged in online spaces, using social media as a means to express themselves, connect with others, and share their lives. However, this digital revolution has also brought about a new set of challenges, especially when it comes to women's beauty ideals.

The influence of social media on female beauty standards and ideals has become a topic of great concern among women's study researchers and scholars. The constant exposure to carefully curated images of idealized beauty on platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Snapchat has led to unrealistic expectations and a negative impact on women's self-esteem.

This subchapter aims to provide an in-depth exploration of the background surrounding the study of social media's role in shaping women's beauty ideals. By understanding the historical context, theoretical perspectives, and empirical research on this topic, we can gain valuable insights into the impact of social media on women's self-perception and body image.

To begin with, it is essential to acknowledge that societal beauty ideals have long been a subject of scrutiny and critique in women's studies. Throughout history, women have faced immense pressure to conform to narrow standards of beauty, perpetuated by various mediums, including advertising, magazines, and now, social media. These beauty ideals often emphasize unrealistic body proportions, flawless skin, and a particular aesthetic that is unattainable for most women.

The advent of social media has exacerbated these unrealistic beauty standards, as it allows for constant comparison and self-objectification. Women are bombarded with images of airbrushed models, influencers, and celebrities who seem to effortlessly embody the ideal beauty standards. This constant exposure creates a toxic cycle, leading women to compare themselves unfavorably, ultimately resulting in low self-esteem and negative body image.

Furthermore, this subchapter will delve into the theoretical frameworks used in understanding the influence of social media on women's beauty ideals. It will explore concepts such as self-objectification theory, social comparison theory, and media effects theory, shedding light on how these theories contribute to our understanding of the detrimental impact of social media on women's self-perception.

Finally, this subchapter will provide an overview of empirical studies conducted in this field, showcasing the findings that further support the negative influence of social media on women's beauty ideals. These studies highlight the correlation between excessive social media use, body dissatisfaction, and low self-esteem among women.

By examining the background of this study, women's study researchers can gain a comprehensive understanding of the influence of social media on female beauty standards and ideals. This knowledge is crucial in developing strategies and recommendations to counteract the negative impact of social media and promote healthier beauty ideals that celebrate diversity, inclusivity, and self-acceptance.

©2023 Sarnia de la Mare (FRSA)

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